Thursday, January 22, 2009

Ceramic Arts Daily

I'm excited to say that I have a project posted on the Ceramic Arts Daily site, which is run by the Potter's Council. It's an instructional article describing how to make a "quilted" wall piece (very similar to this posting). It was fun to think very specifically about how to construct these pieces, and then put it into words. There will be an article in Pottery Making Illustrated coming up in their next issue with an extended version of this project including glazing.

20 comments:

Mama V said...

That's fabulous, Amy! Congratulations!

Poppa Bear said...

Good job Amy! Does this mean that even I can make a piece (keeping in mind how I can destroy pieces by simply leaning on them!)?

BHClaysmith said...

This is really a great way to build a "Clay quilt" which so resembles fabric all on it's own.
Are you working with earthenware on most of your projects?

Barbara Hanselman
BHClaysmith@gmail.com
bhclaysmith.blogspot.com

amy said...

Barbara- I use a cone 6 stoneware, but of course, any clay could work.

Jessa said...

Wait, how did you figure out how still do pottery things after having a baby?

Impressive.

Congrats!

Patricia Griffin said...

I was so please to see your tutorial on Ceramic Arts Daily. Bravo!

standing still said...

I found you through Ceramic Arts Daily, and as a potter AND a quilter (with the older ladies at my church ... I'm just a beginner), I am intrigued by your project. Lovely stuff. Pleased to be introduced to you by the web. Oh, and I'm a mama too ... it gets easier to be in the studio when your boy turns 13 ...

Linda Starr said...

Wow, your clay piece is so beautiful and realistic what a great job and congratulations on the publication. I used to do a bit of fabric quilting years ago and this so reminds me of fabric.

Anonymous said...

This is wonderful work Amy,Keep it up.Will you let us into the secret of how you glaze the pots?I live in Switzerland and love reading about your work and life.

amy said...

Thanks for all the compliments ladies.

Jessa- I'm just keeping my head above water and am totally jealous of your sewing expertise and fun projects!

To my friend from Switzerland- no big secret whatsoever: I brush on black glaze, wipe it off with a damp sponge, then brush on rutile (for the yellow-tan) and red iron oxide (for the rusty purple) and glazes. I'll try to post more about this soon.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Amy for answering so soon my glazing question.Have now subscribed to Pottery Making Illustrated to keep in touch on these new ideas.Thanks a Million. Your Swiss Friend.

barbaraedwards said...

Just saw your quilt article. It's wonderful and thank you so much for sharing your technique. Do or did you make fabric quilts? I thought they - I made lots of baby quilts - were very painstaking and I'm thinking clay pieces will be easier to work with. Am I dreaming? Anyway, your work is beautiful.

Nona said...

Congratulations Amy! Your work is wonderful

sarah said...

Hi Amy! Thanks for a great workshop on Sunday in Cincinnati! Just looking at your blog here I see why I am drawn to your work...we pretty much like the same music, movies, style! :) Best of luck with your endeavors! Your son is adorable!
Peace,
Sarah Dodds, Cincinnati

Paula said...

Amy,
thanks for sharing this tech. I've been trying to get realistic looking clay quilts for a few years for a project that I will do. people are almost startled by how fabric-like the results are.
Paula

Ron said...

Okay Superstar we need a new post all about your workshop and upcoming Covergirl shot. See ya soon!
Ron

amy said...

Sorry Ron. I know. It's coming soon. I keep taking pictures for "future posts" but then the posting doesn't happen. Its a problem.

Su Nottingham said...

Thanks Amy, for the magazine article sharing your technique. I tried a quilt and am looking forward to the finishing steps. The other members of my co-op will be surprised to find me working in slabs. You've been an inspiration!
http://facejugsbysun.blogspot.com

samy said...

very interesting! thanks

Anonymous said...

Amy, I love your work. I am teaching a high school clay class and we are referencing your work because of your article. Can you give me your recipe for rutile oxide washes? And any other recipes for washed to use with your work, We are making quilts , thanks so much. LPortney@mcdonogh.org